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Canada's Most Comprehensive Public Health Report Card (2015-16 Combined CCHS)

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Results for the combined years 2015-16 Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) were released in early November, 2017... all of about 680,000 lines of it! It combined results from the individual years of 2015 and 2016 to allow for a larger sample so one could get statistically reliable results for geographies smaller than the provincial level. This was what is really useful and practical about it, for knowing where to focus to address public health issues that it can help with, since the problem is probably not an even distribution throughout a province.

The following set of interactive, report card style dashboards on Tableau bring out the most telling information from the survey, which is comparisons to the national and provincial averages in each year. You can embed these dashboards into websites allowing for JavaScript below, like I did below, by clicking on the Share icon (third right in from bottom right), or send as a link. The embedding actually carries the variable values at w…

Canada's Most Up to Date Public Health Report Card (CCHS 2016, 2015)

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Results for the Canadian Community Health Survey, 2016 edition, was released in late September, 2017. I finally got around to putting it into a set of interactive Tableau report card dashboards to bring out the most telling information from the survey, which is comparisons to the national average in each year, and comparisons to 2015 results for the 2016 results. You can embed these dashboards into websites allowing for JavaScript below, like I did below, by clicking on the Share icon (third right in from bottom right), or send as a link. The embedding actually carries the variable values at whatever is set on the view you have when you grab the JavaScript, so you can leave the desired view on your blog and talk about it, rather than make the reader change the parameters so they can see what you were seeing when you wrote about it! Lovely feature!

In these report cards, immediate visual results are shown as dots.
Green dots mean (statistically) significantly better* results than the na…

Interactive Dashboard of Anime / Manga Characters Birthday Database

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This is a Tableau visual or "viz" with birthdays of over 1875 anime and manga characters, grouped and accessible in many ways which I will show you below. However, I know there are still many missing. I will show you how to identify some of them so if you were interested in getting me new characters and their birthdates that I can add to the list, please leave them in the comments. Otherwise, just have lots of fun with this in some of the ways I'll describe below, among others you can find!

You can navigate within any of the windows below to access anything the set of dashboards within the viz offers. I just created one window for each dashboard to have a picture of what I'm talking about in describing each dashboard, close to the text to help with reading.


TODAY

You came here for birthdays, so the ideal greeting is a list of which character's birthday it is today. I think the date mechanism is synced to the time on your browser so that someone across the date li…

See How Canadians Have Aged Since 1971 from Visual Demographics Dashboards

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My latest Tableau project involves Canadian population demographics. Statistics Canada has estimates publicly available with many age groups, both traditional genders, and all the provinces and territories, for each year from 1971 to 2016. It's a lot of data which is not only cumbersome to manage and use, but hard to visualize without a lot of work. Well, Tableau enabled me to change that so here are some of the initial offerings. I will write more as I create more interfaces with different ways to organize and/or access the data.



First up is your common scatterplot by single age years. The default view is for all of Canada, both genders. You can see the bump that is the baby boom now in their mid-50s to late 60s, hitting 70. That break in the smooth curve at 70 was 1946, after all the soldiers returned home and people started having babies again. The war ended in late 1945 so give 9 months for birth and you got the boom in 1946 that is a massive jump from 1945.

If you slide that …